With review and feedback from ENT doctor Gregory Parsons, MD (Lancaster, Rock Hill)

It’s a cold winter day and you want to be comfortable, so you turn up the heat. Then, you feel something on your face. You look in the mirror. Darn it! You have a nosebleed. Again. What’s going on? Is the heat giving you a nosebleed?

Heat, dry air, and nosebleeds

Nosebleeds aren’t directly caused by heated air, but the answer isn’t that straightforward. Yes, nosebleeds are common in the winter, but that’s because the air is very dry. Dry air can crack the skin in your nose, which makes it likelier you get a nosebleed.

ENT doctor Gregory Parsons, MD

So why do people think heaters dry out the air even more? Well, that’s because older furnaces do. They would draw air from the house into their combustion chambers, which meant the house was then filled with the dry air from outside.

However, modern furnaces only draw air from outdoors, leaving the air inside untouched. Therefore, the air will not get drier if you turn on your heat. Also, newer furnaces have humidification systems, which further help keep the air moist, CEENTA ENT doctor Gregory Parsons, MD, said.

How can I help my nose?

Dry air is going to be a problem no matter what the temperature is. Fortunately, a humidifier can help rectify that. Not only will it keep your nasal passages moist, but it could help relieve cold and flu symptoms you may be experiencing, too. However, mold and dust allergies are common in the winter, and mold thrives in damp environments, so running a humidifier for too long could be detrimental.

How can I treat my nose?

“You can help your nose by applying bacitracin ointment with a Q-tip inside your nose at night,” Dr. Parsons said. “However, if your nosebleeds don’t resolve in two weeks, you need to see your primary care physician or your ENT doctor.”

Dry winter air and the nosebleeds it causes can be uncomfortable, but with a little bit of preparation, you can keep your home comfortably warm and nosebleed free.

This blog is for informational purposes only. For specific medical questions, please consult your doctor. Would you like an appointment with Dr. Parsons? Call 704-295-3000. You can also request an appointment online or through myCEENTAchart.

 


You may also be interested in

A scratch n sniff sticker
​How do scratch-and-sniff stickers work?

The science behind the smells.

Read More
A man has a runny nose when he eats.
​Why does my nose run when I eat?

Dribbling when dining.

Read More
Dr. Jewel Greywoode and the Charlotte Today host.
Dr. Jewel Greywoode on Charlotte Today

All about deviated septa.

Read More
 




Leave a Comment

 
 


Back to News
This website is optimized for more recent web browsers. Please consider these upgrade options: IE10+ (), Chrome (), Firefox ().