Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the United States.

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Central Serous Retinopathy

Central serous retinopathy (CSR) is caused by leakage of fluid beneath the retina. This bubble or blister of fluid beneath the macula can cause a central scotoma, minification, and blurred vision.

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Cystoid Macular Edema

Cystoid macular edema (CME) is caused by leakage of fluid into the retina. Cysts form from the leakage in the center of the retina, which can be seen best with fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT).

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Diabetic Macular Edema

One of the most frequent causes of vision impairment in the United States and throughout the rest of the world is diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that causes damage to the blood vessels of the retina.

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Epiretinal Membrane and Macular Pucker

The macula is the area of the retina that provides the best vision for reading and fine detail. Scar tissue can sometimes form on the surface of the macula creating distortion and blurry vision.

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Flashes and Floaters

Floaters and flashes are caused by the vitreous gel that fills the eye and lies against the retina.

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Macular Hole

The macula is the area of the retina that provides the best vision (reading and fine detail). A hole in the macula can develop either from vitreo-macular traction (“idiopathic” macular hole), trauma and rarely in near sighted people.

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A Newer Technique for Imaging Your Retina- Ultra-wide Field Retinal Photography and Angiography

The retina is the part of the eye that sends light and visual signals to the brain for processing.

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Ocular Tumors

Ocular tumors are tumors inside the eye. They are collections of cells that grow and multiply abnormally and form masses.

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The Retina

The retina is a light-sensitive layer in the back of the eye that contains highly evolved cells called rods and cones. The retina converts incident light energy into signals that are carried to the brain by the optic nerve. The retina is divided into two areas: the central (macula) and the peripheral retina.

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Retinal Tears and Detachments

There are many different kinds of retinal detachment disorders. The most serious retinal problems requiring surgery are caused by difficulties with the vitreous (a gel-like substance) that is attached to the retina.

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Retinal Vein Occlusion

Central retinal vein occlusion is closure of the final retinal vein (located at the optic nerve).

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Uveitis

Uveitis refers to inflammation of the uveal tract of the eye: the iris, ciliary body and choroid. Together, these form the middle layer of the eye between the retina and the sclera (white of eye).

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Vitrectomy Surgery

Vitrectomy is a type of eye surgery that treats disorders of the retina and vitreous. The vitreous is removed and replaced by a saltwater solution.

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Blepharospasm

Blepharospasm is an involuntary contraction and spasm of the eyelid muscles that causes your eyes to squeeze shut. Blepharospasm is more common in women and usually appears after the age of 50. Generally, one will notice that one’s eyes are blinking and twitching more often. On occasion, it can progress to repeated, forceful, involuntary closing of the eyes.

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Eye Infections

Eye infections are caused by a virus or bacteria in the environment that attacks the eye.

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Conjunctivitis

“Pink eye,” the common name for conjunctivitis, is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva. The conjunctiva is the outer, normally clear covering of the sclera (the white part of the eye). The eye appears pink when you have conjunctivitis because the blood vessels of the conjunctiva are dilated. Pink eye is often accompanied by a discharge, but vision is usually normal and discomfort is mild.

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Dry Eyes

Your eyes constantly produce tears at a slow and steady rate so that they stay moist and comfortable. Some people are not able to produce enough tears or the appropriate quality of tears to keep their eyes healthy or comfortable. This condition is known as dry eye.

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Astigmatism

In order for the eye to work properly, light coming into the eye must be properly focused on the retina (or the back of the eye). When the image is not focused, there is an irregularity in the eye. This irregularity can be the overall shape of the eye or the curvature of the cornea (the clear outer covering of the eye), or both. The cornea should be curved equally in all directions. Astigmatism occurs when the cornea is curved more in one direction than another.

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Myopia

The cornea and lens of the eye work together to properly focus visual images on the retina. If an image is out of focus, it is because the overall shape of the eye is incorrect or because the cornea does not have the proper curvature. When the eye is too big or the cornea is too steep, visual images are focused in front of the retina. This condition is called nearsightedness or myopia.

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Presbyopia

During the early and middle years of life, the lens of the eye provides for the capability to focus both near and distant images. To accomplish this feat, the lens changes shape, getting thicker for near objects and thinner for distant objects.

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Blepharitis

Blepharitis is an infection of the eyelids. It is very common, and it is a permanent condition. Once it is present, it will always be present, but the severity may change over time. In some cases, the symptoms can disappear for long time periods, months or years, before returning.

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Glaucoma Surgery: Pre-operative Instructions and Information

Your doctor has recommended glaucoma and/or cataract surgery. You will be contacted by our surgical coordinator to schedule your surgery date and postoperative appointments. You will receive more detailed information about your surgery at that time.

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Glaucoma Tube Shunt Surgery

Glaucoma drainage implant surgery, sometimes referred to as a tube shunt, may be needed in patients with glaucoma that is not controlled by medications and/or laser treatment. It may be needed either as primary glaucoma surgery in certain types of glaucoma or after failure of trabeculectomy surgery.

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Laser Trabeculoplasty

Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT) is a laser treatment that is used to lower the intraocular pressure of the eye. Laser energy is delivered to the drainage tissue of the eye (called the trabecular meshwork). This leads to increased drainage of fluid from the eye and a lowering of the eye pressure. The full effects of the laser treatment may not be apparent until 1-2 months after the laser treatment.

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